• Justin Handlin

Angry GM's Paragon Monsters

Updated: Aug 31, 2020

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"I WANT BIG BOSS FIGHTS, DAMMIT!" We know exactly how the Angry GM feels on this topic. Luckily, he has solved this problem for us. Crit Academy covers the Angry GM's Paragon Monsters. Epic Dungeons and Dragons boss battles that can leave your players split in twain.


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Main Topic: Angry GM's Paragon Monsters


“Let’s be honest: D&D is a combat-focused game. You can’t argue that. And you’d be stupid to try. You can stay away from combat if you want, but you can’t pretend it isn’t designed around a pretty damned cool combat engine. And the basic structure of the game is a string of mostly action-oriented encounters (including combats) that ultimately resolve a problem or achieve a goal. And, at the end of that string of encounters, we expect something big and climatic. And if we’ve spent most of the game fighting, we expect a big, climactic fight. Boss fights are cool. They are a great way to end an action-oriented game.” - Angry GM

“See, I don’t want to only have dragons as bosses. Or vampires. Whatever. I kind of want to be able to pull a bog-standard kobold out of the book, slap a few modifications on it, and call it Killer Kobby the Kobold Kween. And I wanted something versatile. I wanted to be able to pull off different tricks with my monsters. I want monsters that change forms and change tactics. I want monsters with heads you can sever. I want monsters with body parts you can target to limit its abilities. And I wanted a simple framework to contain it all.” - Angry GM


A Tale of Two Snakes

“Working on a new creature: the two-headed, two-tailed, bifurcated snake. It’s a snake with two heads, two tails, and two completely separate, independent bodies.” - Angry GM twitter


What is the difference between one monster and two monsters?

Two pools of hit points(double the monsters hit points), two turns in each round of combat, occupy two different positions and cannot be affected simultaneously except by certain effects.


What are the benefits?

Spillover damage is lost. In his example an Orc with 5 hit points that takes 12 damage, that excess is lost.

Keeping the hit points separate, creates a visual queue that the monster is weakening, as it loses its extra turn in around.